A collage of the cover of Climate Futures: Re-Imagining Global Climate Justice, the movie poster for Human Flow, and the cover of Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses
A few examples of “Conversation Starters” students will engage with in the course.
Left: Climate Futures: Re-Imagining Global Climate Justice, Kum-Kum Bhavnani, John Foran, Priya A. Kurian, Debashish Munshi.
Center: Human Flow, by Ai Weiwei
Right: Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses, by Robin Wall Kimmerer

Let’s Talk About Climate Change

Fall 2022
Mondays 5-7:30 p.m.
Goodson Chapel (Duke Divinity School)

EI, STS, NS
Catering by Zweli’s Café

Students who enroll in Let’s Talk About Climate Change! will have the opportunity to engage in robust and far-ranging discussions about climate change—and potential solutions to it—with 14 faculty scholars representing fields from energy policy to environmental justice and geology to global health. 

The course will begin with an overview of how Earth’s climate has changed since the Industrial Revolution and what experts predict will happen over the next century. Each week after that, a different Climate Change Faculty Fellow will help lead an hour-long class discussion investigating climate change from a different perspective—from the role language plays in policy making to how social psychologists are working to give us smarter ways to calculate and reduce our carbon footprints. Students and faculty will continue their talk over a catered dinner and in small breakout groups after dinner.

Our goal is to expose students to thought-provoking possibilities about our path forward and help them explore how they can use their talents and voices to bring about positive change and help forge a more sustainable and equitable future for us all.

In the News

A few months ago, a biogeochemist and a theologian took a walk in Duke Gardens to talk about climate change. By the end of the walk, the two had created the framework for a new university course that will draw upon expertise from across Duke’s schools to build climate literacy among students and give them the hope and the ability to take action.

Let’s Talk About Climate Change: Conversations to Build Climate Literacy Among Students,” Duke today

The prompt, which students will be a given a week in advance, could be a Nobel Laureate’s paper on the economic consequences of climate change, a Potawatomi scholar’s essay on global warming’s impacts on Indigenous communities, or a marketing assignment to use psychology to create a clearer and more informative way to label the carbon footprint of food. It could even be an artwork or musical composition.

What it won’t be, is boring. Or easy.

FACULTY FELLOWS AIM TO MAKE NEW UNIVERSITY COURSE ON CLIMATE CHANGE ‘A TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCE’ FOR STUDENTS,” Duke today

Faculty Participation

Dr. Emily Bernhardt and Dr. Norman Wirzba are the lead instructors for UNIV 102: Let’s Talk About Climate Change.  Twelve additional scholars, the Climate Change Faculty Fellows, will participate in the course.  Additional opportunities for faculty to engage with the course are also available.

Duke faculty, please indicate your interest in participating here:
https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9BIPCngKx95cCa2

Emily Bernhardt, James B. Duke Professor of Biogeochemistry and Chair, Department of Biology
Emily Bernhardt, James B. Duke Professor of Biogeochemistry and Chair, Department of Biology
Norman Wirzba, Gilbert T. Rowe Distinguished Professor of Christian Theology and Senior Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics
Norman Wirzba, Gilbert T. Rowe Distinguished Professor of Christian Theology and Senior Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics