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Let’s Talk About Digital You: A Technical and Ethical Exploration of a Data-Centric World

 

Spring 2024

Monday 8:45am-11am

Lecture/Discussion in Social Sciences Building

QS, EI, STS, SS

Unlock the fascinating world of digital identity, technology, and ethics in our course, “Let’s Talk about Digital You: technical and ethical aspects of a data-centric world”. In today’s digital age, where technology is intertwined with every facet of our lives, understanding the complexities and implications of these technologies is essential. Whether you’re a tech enthusiast, a future business leader, or a concerned global citizen, this course is your gateway to exploring the cutting-edge technology that shapes our world.

Taught from a wide-variety of perspectives in the sciences, humanities, and social sciences, you’ll see how fields as diverse as English to medicine are approaching these headline-making technologies that are reshaping society such as Generative art (AI art), large language models (ChatGPT), AI in healthcare and business, and more. This unique course structure blends interactive lectures, hands-on workshops, and dynamic discussions to immerse you in seven captivating learning modules:

I Met Them Online: Exploring Social Y’all (Weeks 1-2)

  • Dive into the world of social media and online communities.
  • Analyze the impact of digital relationships on our lives.

I Made Generative Art: Exploring Generative Art through AI Models (Weeks 3-4)

  • Unlock your creative potential with AI-powered generative art.
  • Discover the fusion of technology and artistic expression.

I Wrote an Essay using ChatGPT: Exploring Large Language Models (Weeks 5-6)

  • Explore the language prowess of ChatGPT and AI in content creation.
  • Discuss the implications of AI-generated content on communication.

I’ve Got Nothing to Hide: Privacy and Security (Weeks 7-8)

  • Delve into the world of digital privacy and security.
  • Explore the trade-offs between convenience and safeguarding your digital identity.

I Applied for Credit: Exploring Automated Decision Making in Business (Weeks 9-10)

  • Navigate the world of automated decisions in business and finance.
  • Scrutinize the ethics of algorithmic lending and decision-making.

I Got an Alert on my Smart Watch: Exploring AI in Healthcare (Weeks 11-12)

  • Immerse yourself in AI’s role in healthcare and wellness.
  • Assess the ethical considerations of AI-driven healthcare solutions.

I Couldn’t Stop Scrolling: Exploring your Digital Brain (Week 13-14)

  • Reflect on your digital consumption habits and their impact.
  • Propose strategies for responsible digital engagement and maintaining a healthy digital balance.

 

We’re excited to have you along this intellectual journey as we grapple with the most pressing technological and ethical questions of our era. “Let’s Talk about Digital You: technical and ethical aspects of a data-centric world” is your passport to the digital world’s heart and soul.

In the News

“My hope is they will be much more thoughtful about promises and perils of digital age and how to navigate them for themselves and for society,” Farahany said. “As with the other university courses, it’s not just about developing understanding of a challenging program. In our digital age, students need to be part of the solution. They need to help us use technology to lead us to an age of human flourishing rather than one of human crisis.”

New University Course Offers a Technical and Ethical Exploration of Our Data-Centric World, duke today

Faculty Co-Conveners

Robinson O. Everett Distinguished Professor of Law & Philosophy at Duke Law School and the Founding Director of Duke Science & Society
Nita Farahany, Robinson O. Everett Distinguished Professor of Law & Philosophy at Duke Law School and the Founding Director of Duke Science & Society

Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nutrition and in the Department of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology at Duke University Medical Center, and a faculty member of the Duke Institute of Molecular Physiology
Matthew Hirschey, Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nutrition and in the Department of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology at Duke University Medical Center, and a faculty member of the Duke Institute of Molecular Physiology