UNIV102's inaugural cohort of Climate Change Communication Fellows. 
Top row: Ayesha Gulrajani, Anna Whitaker, Audrey Thellman, Ciro Incoronato, Cristina Carnemolla
Middle row: Dana McLachlin, Elizabeth Apple, Jessica Doyle, Jonathan Behrens, Julia Plasynski
Bottom row: Kiersten Hasenour, Madison Hill, Pratyarth Rao, Tony Nguyen
UNIV102’s inaugural cohort of Climate Change Communication Fellows.
Top row: Ayesha Gulrajani, Anna Whitaker, Audrey Thellman, Ciro Incoronato, Cristina Carnemolla
Middle row: Dana McLachlin, Elizabeth Apple, Jessica Doyle, Jonathan Behrens, Julia Plasynski
Bottom row: Kiersten Hasenour, Madison Hill, Pratyarth Rao, Tony Nguyen

As the inaugural cohort of Climate Change Communication Fellows, these 14 graduate students will engage UNIV102 students in small group discussions about climate change.

Ayesha Gulrajani, Head Teaching Assistant and a Master of Engineering Management student in the Pratt School of Engineering, is passionate about being at the intersection of tech and business. She is an aspiring Product Manager, who aims at delivering products that can positively impact all of humankind.

Anna Whitaker, is a Master of Theological Studies student at the Duke Divinity School pursuing a certificate in Food, Faith, and Environmental Justice. She is interested in the pursuit of food security and sovereignty, sustainable food production and policy, and a theological ethic of eating.

Audrey Thellman is an ecosystem scientist interested in understanding how climate change is impacting freshwater. In her PhD, she is answering how river primary productivity in the Northeastern United States is responding to warmer winters and declining snowpacks.

Ciro Incoronato is a PhD candidate in Romance Studies. His interests span from Italian literature and philosophy to French Theory and environmental studies. His first book, published in Italian in 2016, explores the ethical consequences of biotechnology.

Cristina Carnemolla is a PhD candidate in Romance Studies, double track in Italian and Spanish. She works on 19th-century Italian, Spanish, and Latin American literature, and her academic interests range from post- and decolonial studies, to gender theory and ecocriticism applied to the analysis of Italian and Spanish naturalist and realist novels.

Dana McLachlin is a PhD student in Cultural Anthropology whose research focuses on gender, labor, and extraction in Bangladesh.

Elizabeth Apple is a second-year PhD student in the Department of English. Her research focuses on American literature of the 19th to mid-20th centuries. Her work is broadly concerned with the intersections between literature, religion, and science.

Jessica Doyle is a fourth-year PhD candidate in Romance Studies. Her research is closely connected to climate change, as she is focused on media coverage and social impacts of environmental crises in the Amazon and Andean regions of Latin America, particularly in relation to extractivism, infrastructure development, and colonial legacies.

Jonathan Behrens, PhD candidate in the University Program in Ecology (UPE), is an aspiring urban stream ecologist who synthesizes methods and theoretical frameworks from environmental chemistry, ecotoxicology, and ecosystem ecology to study the transport and ecological impact of contaminant mixtures persistent in urban systems.

Julia Plasynski, a Master of Environmental Management: Ecosystem Science and Conservation student, is interested in endangered species conservation, climate change mitigation, and bridging the gap between science experts and the public. Her focus is on human-wildlife coexistence – specifically elephants and humans in Gabon.

Kiersten Hasenour is a PhD candidate in the Sociology department. She is interested in social psychology, culture, and inequality, with a particular focus on how cultural narratives and understandings reproduce and perpetuate existing stereotypes and social structures.

Madison Hill is a Master of Fine Arts student in Experimental and Documentary Arts. She is a documentary filmmaker and photographer focusing on the environmental and social impacts of anthropogenic climate change.

Pratyarth Rao is a Master of Engineering Management student, and is curious about finding feasible and scalable ways to transition the world towards sustainable technology. He loves to talk about the carbon footprint of big tech and how to develop more sustainable and inclusive alternatives to the current methods used by the world.

Tony B. Nguyen, third year Master of Divinity student at the Duke Divinity School, studies the intersection of Christian biblical interpretation and sustainable agriculture. His interests include Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, poetry, agrarianism, Asian American identity, and Anglicanism.